Medicaid Drug Spending Surge Driven Mostly by Enrollment, Not Prices Press Releases

From 2014 to 2016, New York’s Medicaid program saw a surge in drug spending that Governor Andrew Cuomo blamed on “abusive” behavior by drug manufacturers. A new Empire Center issue brief shows that, after accounting for rebates, the surge was smaller than Cuomo described, and that it was mostly driven by enrollment growth. Overall, the report finds that price increases accounted for about one-fifth of the spending surge, while enrollment accounted for four-fifths.

Cuomo’s Essential dilemma by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

Federal officials have reportedly confirmed that they are cutting off a major portion of funding for New York’s Essential Plan, opening a roughly $1 billion hole in the state budget and raising new doubts about the future of a rapidly growing health insurance option for the working poor.

A reality check on Medicare changes by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

A technical change in how Medicare compensates hospitals for treating the poor and uninsured has drawn a heated response from Governor Andrew Cuomo that demands clarification.

NY to keep longer ACA signup by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

New York is planning to demur from some of the Trump administration’s rule changes for Obamacare, including its much shorter enrollment window.

Bending NY’s Medicaid curve by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

Per-recipient spending by New York's Medicaid program has long far exceeded the national norm, a telling symptom of inefficiency in the state's health plan for the poor. But the gap appears to have narrowed significantly during Governor Andrew Cuomo's term, with New York's spending rate falling at about twice the national average between 2010 and 2014.