What the Republican tax plan means for New Yorkers Albany Business Review

E.J. McMahon, research director of the Empire Center for Public Policy, a fiscally conservative research group in Albany, said earlier this week eliminating the state and local income tax deduction would hurt New York.

"From the state budget standpoint, still, if they repeal the income tax deduction, that is a huge threat to New York more than any other state to our tax base, and that's because the state has become dangerously over-reliant on taxes paid by the highest-earning 1 percent," McMahon said.

The NY tax hike in Trump’s tax cut by E.J. McMahon | New York Post

Plenty of unintended consequences, positive and negative, will be lurking in the fine print of the tax-reform bill unveiled Thursday by House Republicans.

But it’s already clear the plan would clobber Albany’s favorite cash cow: the seven-figure earners who generate more than 40 percent of the state income tax.

Trump’s economic lesson for New York New York Post Editorial

As the Empire Center’s E.J. McMahon notes, every one of the state’s 12 “metropolitan statistical areas” saw growth below the national average in 2016.

If New York doesn’t change its ways and get serious about lowering taxes and cutting back regulation, it will keep on losing ground.

Why NYers could lose under Trump tax plan Rochester Democrat & Chronicle

Any savings in New York, particularly in the New York City suburbs with high taxes, would be negligible compared with what other states may see, said E.J. McMahon, president of the Empire Center, a fiscally conservative group in Albany.

"This much is clear: A couple falling well within the middle class by downstate standards — people, in most cases, living paycheck-to-paycheck in modest suburban homes — will realize much smaller savings than their counterparts in lower-cost, lower-taxed states across the country," he wrote.

N.Y. Mayor Wants New Tax on the Rich to Fund Transit Improvements Dow Jones Newswire

New York City is among the highest-taxed cities in the U.S. The combined federal, state and local income-tax rate for individual filers making $1 million or more in New York City is 48.25% when taking into account deductions, said E.J. McMahon, founder and research director of the Empire Center for Public Policy, a think tank based in Albany, N.Y. That rate, which doesn't include health care or Social Security taxes, would increase to about 48.57% under Mr. de Blasio's proposal.