Indigent Carelessness by Bill Hammond | Reports

New York State’s “Indigent Care Pool” doles out more than $1 billion a year in grants to hospitals, ostensibly to reimburse them for providing free care to the poor and uninsured. But most of the time, how much money a hospital receives bears no relation to how much charity care it delivers.

State misspends $1.1B charity-care fund, study finds Press Releases

A billion-dollar state program to reimburse hospital charity care is having a reverse Robin Hood effect, shortchanging hospitals that serve poorer patients to the benefit of those that serve more affluent populations, according to a new analysis by Empire Center health policy director Bill Hammond.

NY’s Obamacare blame game by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

This month’s setbacks for New York’s healthcare system were largely driven by flaws in the ACA, not by attacks on the law from President Trump or Republicans in Congress.

NYers face $1.1B premium ‘HIT’ by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

The scheduled return of an Obamacare tax on insurance premiums in 2018 would cost New Yorkers $1.1 billion in the first year, according to an industry-sponsored report published this week.

Could D.C. repeat Albany’s mistake? by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

Washington lawmakers are contemplating fallback healthcare legislation that risks repeating one of Albany’s most notorious policy blunders – and triggering a “death spiral” in non-group insurance markets nationwide.

A closer look at BCRA credits by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

Insurance tax credits in the U.S. Senate GOP’s health plan would have a mixed effect on New Yorkers, reducing net premiums for some young, low-income consumers shopping in the non-group market, but raising costs for older ones.

How Senate plan would affect NY by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

The U.S. Senate GOP’s health bill, though pitched as more moderate than the House plan, would be harder on New York in at least one respect.

Why NY premiums are spiking by Bill Hammond | NY Torch

The double-digit premium hikes looming for non-group health insurance consumers in New York appear to be driven more by state and federal government policy than by the underlying cost of medical care.