Fixing NY Medicaid by E.J. McMahon | | New York Post

New York’s Medicaid program is now testing, on a small and limited scale, giving people financial incentives and requiring compliance in changing their behavior. The approach has promise — if done right; it’s important to keep in mind the lessons of welfare reform.

Taking Ownership: The Patient’s Role in Medicaid | Events

New York has the nation's largest Medicaid program, serving over 5 million enrollees at a cost of $54 billion annually. But a small percentage of Medicaid patients, with chronic medical and behavioral health diseases account for a disproportionate share of the program's total spending. "Taking Ownership: The Patient's role in Medicaid" profiles some reforms largely overlooked in the state's redesign, healthcare experts from around the state participated in a panel discussion hosted by the Empire Center.

Report: Patient Incentives Would Improve NY Medicaid | Press Releases

New York State can save money and improve health outcomes in its $54 billion Medicaid program by giving patients more incentive to “take ownership” of their own healthcare, according to a new report released today by the Empire Center for Public Policy.

NY Medicaid on the ropes? by Russell Sykes | | NY Torch

In a battle going back 15 years, the federal Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) has pledged to reduce Medicaid reimbursements to New York for the state's developmentally disabled centers by as much as 80 percent. Daily rates per patient at the facilities had jumped from just over $1,700 in 1999 to over $5,100 by 2011.

Feds aim for big cut in NY’s Medicaid dollars by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

Federal Medicaid reimbursements to New York State could be cut by $1 billion a year to make up for more than two decades of excessive claims that one congressman compared to “fraud.”

NY’s Medicaid waiver wager by Russell Sykes | | NY Torch

Governor Andrew Cuomo is betting the house on Medicaid managed care ringing up estimated savings of $34 billion, to be split between New York and the federal government over the next five years.