Bloomberg’s Misplaced (Compassionate) Side by E.J. McMahon | | Gotham Gazette

One welcome change in Mayor Michael Bloomberg's preliminary budget is a more accurate count of New York City's enormous municipal workforce. It turns out there are even more city employees than anyone previously thought -- ironically underscoring just how little Mayor Bloomberg is initially proposing in the way of agency workforce reductions, despite all the talk of budgetary "pain."

City Won’t Bleed From Bloomberg’s Ax by E.J. McMahon | | Newsday

Overshadowed by his predecessor for most of an all-too-brief transition period, Michael Bloomberg has emerged into the mayoral spotlight with an impressive early show of fiscal leadership.

They Don’t Get It by E.J. McMahon | | New York Posts

Will the next mayor restore New York's battered, post-9/11 economy? The candidates' recovery plans don't inspire much confidence.

Most of Mark Green's answers come out of the 1930s. And while Michael Bloomberg seems to have learned a few lessons from the '90s, he's still reluctant to embrace the most growth-oriented elements of the Giuliani philosophy.

Turning The Page by E.J. McMahon | | New York Post

Giuliani took office declaring that city government was too big and taxes were too high. His first two budgets cut the headcount of city employees and reduced spending, setting the stage for both tax cuts and a series of surpluses.

Worse City Budget News Ahead by E.J. McMahon | | New York Post

It’s official: According to Mayor Giuliani's latest fiscal plan, the next mayor will face a budget gap of $2.7 billion - which, if it actually materializes, will be $400 million more than the one Giuliani inherited from David Dinkins.

Rudy’s Tax Cuts Don’t Go Far Enough by E.J. McMahon | | New York Post

When Mayor Giuliani formally unveils his eighth and final city budget today, advocates of more expansive city spending are sure to attack his proposed tax cuts. Ironically, Giuliani will be accused of cutting taxes too much - when, if anything, he hasn't cut them nearly enough.