Departing New Yorkers not a recent trend Media Coverage

Such departures are a longstanding part of the state's history, according to a 2011 study by the Empire Center for New York State Policy, a conservative-leaning, Albany-based think tank.

That report found that since 1960, New York had lost about 7.3 million residents to other states. That was partially offset by the arrival of 4.8 million immigrants, for a net decline of about 2.5 million residents.

New York continues to lose more people to other states WNYT

"Upstate is not creating jobs. And you're not going to hang out in Upstate New York waiting for a job to turn up," McMahon said.

Upstate is where the overall net loss for the state is coming from. McMahon, who's been crunching Census Bureau data said the impact is obvious.

The (continued) graying of NY by E.J. McMahon | NY Torch

Compared to national and statewide averages, rural counties in upstate New York have a much larger share of residents aged 65 and older, the latest Census Bureau estimates show.

The 65+ population was 15.3 percent of the U.S. total as of mid-2016, according to census data released today. The Empire State as a whole was just a hair above the national average, with 15.4 percent of New Yorkers falling into the age category that demographers generally tag as elderly.
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