Schools Plan to Spend at Twice Inflation Rate Press Releases

Fueled by an increase in state aid and higher property taxes, the 669 school districts subject to New York’s property tax levy cap plan to spend 2.8 percent more per student in 2016-17 than they did this year, according to an analysis released today by the Empire Center for Public Policy. Per-pupil tax levies, meanwhile, would increase by an average of 1.3 percent.

Tax cap a near-freeze for 2016-17 by E.J. McMahon | NY Torch

State Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli has officially confirmed what federal inflation statistics were already telegraphing: New York's statutory cap on local school property tax levies will be just a hair above zero for 2016-17 school year budgets, which will be submitted for voter approval in May.

Crocodile tears over NY’s tax cap by E.J. McMahon | New York Post

Long Island town officials are crying the blues over the budgetary squeeze supposedly created by the state’s property-tax cap. They’re not alone: You’ll hear much the same from town pols elsewhere in the metro region and across New York state.

But the thrust of their complaints — that the tax cap is somehow blocking urgent public projects and programs — just won’t hold water.

Warning: lower tax hikes ahead by E.J. McMahon | NY Torch

The starting point for computing next year's local property tax cap in most of New York State will be less than 1 percent—and so state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli is warning local governments "brace for ... [lower] growth in property tax revenues."

DiNapoli's tone clearly implies that a lower tax cap is a negative. But most property owners will no doubt see it another way.

Tax cap sausage still in grinder? by E.J. McMahon | NY Torch

Based on initial descriptions, the delayed end-of-session "big ugly" package deal announced Tuesday afternoon by Governor Andrew Cuomo and legislative leaders is simply confounding on the subject of property taxes.

Although Cuomo and Senate Republicans both said they wanted to make the state's 2 percent property tax cap permanent, the cap apparently will be extended only temporarily.

Duffy: RBA calling for permanent property tax cap in New York Rochester Democrat & Chronicle

In 2010, the median property tax paid in Monroe County was $4,035 — almost twice as much the national median of $2,043. In fact, Monroe County real estate taxes as a percentage of home value ranked second highest in the nation out of 806 counties. The same is true across the region. The median property tax paid in Livingston and Ontario counties each exceeded $3,000.