Media Coverage

New York's Medicaid program is facing its own $4 billion deficit, first reported not by the Cuomo administration but a fiscal watchdog. The Empire Center for Public Policy reported this summer that the state played a fast game with its Medicaid expenses as the 2018-19 fiscal year reached its end. Instead of paying some 80,000 providers more than $1.7 billion it owned them, the state pushed that expense into April, where it was recorded in a new fiscal year. With that, the previous cycle appeared to be healthier than it was. It was a classic Albany gimmick. Read More

"Thanks to Medicaid over-spending, New York's state budget gaps have blown up to their highest levels since the Great Recession," wrote E.J. McMahon, founder of the Empire Center for Public Policy, a fiscally conservative think tank in Albany. Read More

But Medicaid has been facing a growing deficit, one that was not so quickly acknowledged in public by the governor. It wasn't until the summer before a fiscal watchdog group, the Empire Center, found that the state last March, in the closing days of the state's fiscal year, rolled over $1.7 billion in Medicaid payments to some 80,000 providers, like hospitals, into April - and, thus, the start of a new fiscal year. Read More

When a significant number of labor groups, coupled with the hospital and insurance industries, take a stance against legislation in Albany, that would usually be enough to stop the measure in its tracks. What is unusual about the New York Health Act is that it continues to be potentially viable, having passed previously in the state Assembly, and having gained a flock of Senate co-sponsors, said William Hammond, director of health policy for the Empire Center for Public Policy. Read More

According to a recent report by the Empire Center for New York State Policy, the city’s $51.66 effective property tax rate ranks ninth in Western New York behind Cheektowaga in Erie County and the Allegany County municipalities of Wellsville, Andover, Alfred, Almond, Burns, Cuba and Alma. Jamestown’s effective tax rate is the highest in Chautauqua County. Read More

When a significant number of labor groups, coupled with the hospital and insurance industries, take a stance against legislation in Albany, that would usually be enough to stop the measure in its tracks. What is unusual about the New York Health Act is that it continues to be potentially viable, having passed previously in the state Assembly, and having gained a flock of Senate co-sponsors, said William Hammond, director of health policy for the Empire Center for Public Policy. Read More

But critics like McMahon argue tying up millions in state funding in order to serve a few municipalities does little to benefit the state as a whole. The money, he said, would be better used addressing regional infrastructure concerns that will make larger swaths of the state more appealing, ultimately leading to greater outside economic investment. Read More

According to a recent report by the Empire Center for New York State Policy, the city’s $51.66 effective property tax rate ranks ninth in western New York behind Cheektowaga in Erie County and the Allegany County municipalities of Wellsville, Andover, Alfred, Almond, Burns, Cuba, and Alma. Jamestown’s effective tax rate is the highest in Chautauqua County. Read More

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Empire Center for Public Policy
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About

The Empire Center is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit think tank located in Albany, New York. Our mission is to make New York a better place to live and work by promoting public policy reforms grounded in free-market principles, personal responsibility, and the ideals of effective and accountable government.