New York lost another 191,367 residents to other states during the year ending last July 1, and its population declined for the first time in a decade, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s annual population estimates.

The latest estimated annual “net domestic migration” loss—equivalent to nearly the entire population of Yonkers, New York’s fourth-largest city—is the Empire State’s largest since 2007. It brings New York’s total outflow over the last six years to 846,669 people—more than any other state’s, both in absolute terms and as a share of population as measured by the 2010 census.

As of July 1, New York’s estimated population of 19,745,289 was down 1,894 people from a year earlier. While the decrease was slight—just 0.01 percent—2015-16 marks the first year since 2005-06 in which New York State’s estimated population dropped by any amount.

New York also was a national leader in two categories: foreign immigration, which added 118,748 residents, and “natural increase” (births minus deaths), which added 75,794 people. Only California and Florida attracted more foreign immigrants, and only California and Texas had higher natural gains.

The new data put New York further behind Florida, which moved ahead into third place in total state population rankings two years ago. While New York’s population dipped, Florida gained another 367,525 residents in 2015-16. Texas led all states with a gain of 432,957 residents in that period. Ranked by percentage growth, Utah, Nevada, Idaho and Florida topped the list.

Six-year cumulative migration data for all states are detailed here.

The Census Bureau’s 2015 county-by-county migration data are broken down here.

Where are New Yorkers headed? Some answers in this September 2011 report.

dec2016-migration-9354128

 

About the Author

E.J. McMahon

Edmund J. McMahon is Empire Center's founder and a senior fellow.

Read more by E.J. McMahon

You may also like

Learning Loss in New York During the Pandemic

Last Spring, students statewide in grades 3-8 sat for annual state assessments to measure proficiency in English language arts (ELA) and math. Read More

HEMMED OUT: Why Legislative Employees Can’t Unionize Under the Taylor Law

Union advocates have argued that employees of the New York State Legislature are covered by the Taylor Law, the 1967 state law that requires state and local public employers, including state agencies, municipalities, and school districts, to recognize and Read More

The Market Can Drive Electric Vehicle Sales

Overview New York has adopted a statutory goal that 100 percent of new passenger car and truck sales be zero-emissions vehicles (ZEVs) by 2035. Ultimately, the only way to accomplish this goal will be to prohibit sales of new Read More

New York Property Tax Calculator 2021

New York’s property tax rates are generally among the highest in the nation. Specific property tax burdens vary widely throughout the state. Read More

OT Payments to Gotham Government Workers Spike 

Overtime payouts to New York City government employees rose by more than one-third last year. The City paid out a total of $2.44 billion dollars in overtime in Fiscal Year 2022, a 36 percent increase from the prior year’s total of $1.8 billion. The P Read More

Benchmarking New York 2021

To help New Yorkers compare certain basic fiscal measures for local governments, the Empire Center has calculated effective property tax rates and per-capita values for the spending, debt and tax levels throughout the state. Read More

Long-Term Crisis

A large share of the state’s Medicaid budget is flowing to personal care, or non-medical services provided to the elderly and disabled at home. Read More

Charging Forward: New York’s Costly Rush to Electrify School Buses

A new law requires New York State’s school bus fleet be entirely zero-emission by 2035. But it's unlikely the state can meet that deadline. Read More

Empire Center Logo Enjoying our work? Sign up for email alerts on our latest news and research.
Together, we can make New York a better place to live and work!