Everyone knows it’s windy by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

State regulations to allow natural gas hydrofracking in New York’sdepressed Southern Tier region are being held up by Governor Cuomo, who says he wants more study of the health effects of fracking.

Job numbers and gas by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

New York’s rising unemployment rate is “presenting a challenge for Gov. Andrew M. Cuomo as he tries to build an image as a fiscal centrist who can transform the state’s business climate,” today’s New York Times reports.

The economic stakes of NY’s shale gas slowdown by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

The slow-motion process of developing state regulations to allow natural gas hydro-fracking in upstate New York seems to have reached stall speed, now that Governor Andrew Cuomo has ordered up a new health impact review that could force the Department of Environmental Conservation to miss a Nov. 29 deadline for issuing fracking rules.

The Economic Impacts of Closing and Replacing the Indian Point Energy Center | Reports

Located some 40 miles north of New York City, in Westchester County, the Indian Point Energy Center (IPEC) consists of two operating nuclear reactors, with a combined generating capacity of over 2,000 MW, and one long-retired reactor. IPEC’s size and location are the key factors in both the power it provides and the decades-long fight to shutter the plant permanently.

The potential payoff from “fracking” by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

Ending the moratorium on "hydrofracking" of natural gas in upstate New York would spur over $11.4 billion in economic output, create 15,000 to 18,000 jobs in the Western New York and the Southern Tier regions, and generate $1.4 billion in state and l...

The Economic Opportunities of Shale Energy Development | Reports

Directional drilling and hydraulic fracturing have unlocked vast new reserves of natural gas in the United States. Development of these resources is now well under way in Pennsylvania and West Virginia. Unlike their neighbors to the south, however, New York residents are not directly benefiting from natural gas development as the result of a government-imposed moratorium, itself a response to environmental concerns surrounding hydraulic fracturing.