Pension fund return falls short by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

New York State's largest public pension fund earned 7.16 percent — short of its 7.5 percent target — during the fiscal year ending March 31, state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli announced today.

The $183.5 billion Common Retirement Fund, of which DiNapoli is sole trustee, had previously announced a first-quarter gain of 3.8 percent, a second-quarter loss of 0.52 percent and a third-quarter gain of 1.91 percent.

Pension fund inches up by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

New York State's largest public pension fund earned 1.91 percent during the quarter ending Dec. 31, state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli announced today.
Meanwhile, the New York State Teachers' Retirement System (NYSTRS) has confirmed its contribution rate will drop for the first time in five years when pension bills for 2015-16 come due in the fall.

Neither announcement says much about the long-term future path of taxpayer-funded pension costs in New York, however.

NY’s early retiree back-to-work waive | Reports

Retired New York state and local government employees under the age of 65 cannot collect full public pension benefits if they earn more than $30,000 by returning to work for a state or local agency – but the earnings limit for younger retirees collecting both pensions and pay from government can be waived “temporarily” in certain circumstances.

To hedge or not to hedge? by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

The $300 billion California Public Employees' Retirement System (Calpers), America's largest public pension fund, is eliminating its $4 billion stake hedge funds due to their "complexity, cost, and the lack of ability to scale," the fund's interim chief investment officer has just announced. But the the $180 billion New York State and Local Retirement System (NYSLRS), the nation's second largest public pension fund, is poised to move in the opposite direction.

More pension “alternative” stakes ahead? by E.J. McMahon | | NY Torch

New York’s public pension funds will have the green light to significantly increase their asset allocations to “alternative investments,” such as private equity and hedge funds, under a bill that looks greased for passage in both houses of the state Legislature.