Residents of the Mid-Hudson village of Liberty had the highest effective property tax rate in New York (outside New York City and Nassau) during fiscal year 2019, according to the newest edition of Benchmarking NY, the Empire Center’s annual examination of local property taxes.

Liberty, a small village in Sullivan County with a population of less than 5,000, had an effective rate of $60.81 per $1,000 of estimated market value—or $9,121 on a $150,000 house. The lowest effective tax rate in the state was $3.93 per $1,000, levied on homes and businesses in the Sagaponack school district portion of the Suffolk County town of Southampton. That low rate reflected the town’s high property values, where the latest Census Bureau data put the median home price at $626,400.

One Suffolk County village – Lloyd Harbor – had combined annual taxes of $38,341 on a median-value home. The lowest tax bill on a median-value home was $1,128 in the Hamilton County town of Arietta in the Raquette Lake school district, which sends its small handful of students to neighboring districts.

Benchmarking NY uses data from the state comptroller’s office to calculate effective tax rates–combined county, municipal and school taxes as a percent of market value–for thousands of localities across the state during 2019, excluding only New York City and Nassau County. The complete report lists the top and bottom 20 tax rates and tax bills on a locality’s median-value home in each of nine regions. The highest effective rate and highest tax bill on a median-value home in each region were found in the following communities:

screen-shot-2019-11-26-at-11-51-03-am-1597342

Taxpayers can see the components of their local property taxes and compare taxes across the state using the Empire Center’s Property Tax Calculator on SeeThroughNY.net, the Center’s transparency website.

The Empire Center, based in Albany, is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan think tank dedicated to promoting policies to make New York a better place to live, work and raise a family.

You may also like

Port Authority’s Overtime Surge Wiped Out ‘Cashless’ Savings

Seven Port Authority of New York and New Jersey employees last year collected more than $200,000 each in overtime as total overtime surged, according to 2023 payroll data posted today on SeeThroughNY, the Empire Center’s government transparency website. The five-year increase in overtime far exceeds the Port Authority's payroll savings from phasing out bridge and tunnel toll collectors over the same period. Read More

Empire Index: State’s On Wrong Track, Tax Cap Popular And More

Three in five New Yorkers (60 percent) say the state is on the wrong track, up from 55 percent earlier this year, according to the latest Empire Index poll of registered voters by the Empire Center for Public Policy. Read More

School Budgets Outpace Inflation As Districts Plan To Spend Over $33K Per Student

School districts presenting budgets to voters next Tuesday plan to spend an average of $33,404 per student, up 4.4 percent from the current school year, according to new state data. Read More

MTA Payroll Jumps 9 Percent As Overtime Goes Off the Rails Again

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA)’s payroll jumped $663 million, or 9 percent, last year as overtime spending ticked up to a new record and subsidiaries dished out $261 million in retroactive pay, according to data posted today on SeeThroughNY, the Empire Center’s government transparency website. Read More

Empire Center Experts React to FY25 Budget

"This year’s budget process was an avoidable trainwreck. New York is the only state that begins its fiscal year on April 1, earlier than anyone else. This has contributed to Albany’s new, old tradition of missing deadlines, then hurriedly voting on bills before lawmakers can fully review them. Moving the fiscal year start would make the budget process more transparent and give lawmakers time to better perform their duty as the state’s board of directors." Read More

Teacher Pensions Added to SeeThroughNY Include 25 Over $300K

New York’s two teacher pension systems last year had 25 retirees eligible to collect pensions of more than $300,000, according to data posted today on SeeThroughNY, the Empire Center’s government transparency website. Read More

Median Teacher Pay Tops $100K In Five Counties, Two Boroughs, 1/4 of NY Districts

A total of 189 out of 685 school districts outside New York City last year had median classroom teacher pay over $100,000, according to data posted today on SeeThroughNY, the Empire Center’s government transparency website, up from 156 five years earlier. Read More

More is Never Enough: NY’s School Spending

The latest federal data show New York's public school system has the highest per-pupil spending of any state; New York City has the highest per-pupil spending among the nation’s 50 largest school districts; and New York teachers have the highest average pay while pupil-teacher ratio is among the lowest. Read More