screen-shot-2018-10-19-at-10-04-05-am-150x150-9251522New York’s latest employment data continue to show a lopsided divide between upstate and downstate.

As of November, the Empire State added 114,600 private-sector jobs on a year-over-year basis—a 1.4 percent increase during a period when private employment nationally grew by 1.9 percent, or one-third faster rate—according to the monthly jobs report released today by the state Labor Department.

New York City accounted for 72,500 jobs, a 1.8 percent growth rate. Long Island and lower Hudson Valley added 18,100 jobs, although Duchess-Putnam was the only downstate labor market to match the national growth rate of 1.9 percent.

Upstate was a very different story. As shown below, all of the region’s major labor markets grew by less than 1 percent. Binghamton and Syracuse had growth rates of zero, while sickly Elmira shrank by another percentage point. The numbers in the November jobs report reflect a continuation of New York’s decidedly uneven recovery from the Great Recession.

screen-shot-2018-12-20-at-4-28-42-pm-8474642

The state’s unemployment rate was estimated at 3.9 percent, slightly above the national level of 3.7 percent. In the long term, nearly all of the decline in unemployment from recessionary peak levels upstate has been due to labor force shrinkage rather than increases in the number of people reporting they have jobs, while the downstate trend has reflected increases in employment and the labor force.

A shown in the following chart from the jobs report, education and health services was (yet again) the leading source of new employment, while manufacturing declined (again).

 

screen-shot-2018-12-20-at-4-13-33-pm-1-1506789

About the Author

E.J. McMahon

Edmund J. McMahon is Empire Center's founder and a senior fellow.

Read more by E.J. McMahon

You may also like

Running Over Taxpayers: Legislature Speeding to Protect Cadillac Benefits for NYC Retirees

Bills designed to block any change to retiree health coverage for state and local public employees have been introduced repeatedly by legislators in both parties over the past 30 years. But the latest statewide “anti-diminution” measure, inspired by an ongoing controversy in New York City, would be the broadest and most costly yet—and more than two-thirds of state lawmakers are supporting it. Read More

How a Medicaid ‘Cut’ Could Lead to More Unionization of Home Care Aides

A money-saving maneuver in the newly enacted Medicaid budget could end up increasing costs in the long term – by paving the way for more unionization of the state's burgeoning home health workforce. Read More

Eight in 10 New York towns and cities have lost population since 2020

Filling in more details of New York's ongoing demographic decline, the Census Bureau has just released updated local population estimates showing that 80 percent of the state's towns and cities have lost residents since 2020. In addition to New York Ci Read More

Sales tax receipts are signaling slow growth in most of New York State

After rising sharply with an extra push from the inflation surge of 2022, sales tax receipts in New York grew much more slowly during the first four months of this year, according to from state Comptroller Thomas DiNapoli's office. Statewide sales tax Read More

Punted ERA Proposition Is a Victory for the Rule of Law

The rule of law scored a victory yesterday when a proposition to amend the equal rights provision of the state Constitution got knocked off this fall’s general election ballot.  Read More

Upstate Catches A Big Break As Offshore Wind Deals Sink

The cancellation of planned offshore wind projects has sparked considerable heartburn and hand-wringing among lawmakers, activists and politically wired businesses and unions, but it’s been good news for the upstate families and businesses who would be paying more than half the cost. For them, each year of delays on scotched projects amounts to future electric-bill savings of upwards of $1 billion—and gives Albany another chance to find a better, less expensive way to go green. Read More

A Squatters “Fix” That May Fix Squat

Lawmakers are taking victory laps over language in the state budget related to "squatters" but the change hasn't given property owners any rights or options they didn't already have. Read More

Budget Deal Slows Medicaid Growth But Plants Seeds for Future Spending

The growth of New York's Medicaid spending is projected to slow but not stop as Governor Hochul and the Legislature effectively split their differences over health care in the newly enacted state budget. Read More