The village of Islandia had the highest effective property tax rate in Suffolk County, paying $42.64 per $1,000 of property values during 2014, according to the newest edition of Benchmarking NY, the Empire Center’s annual examination of local property taxes.

“There’s no question that New Yorkers pay some of the highest property taxes in the country, but the burden can vary widely even among neighboring jurisdictions,” said Tim Hoefer, executive director of the Empire Center. “By making it easier to compare taxes in different localities, we hope to encourage local taxpayers and elected officials to search for ways of reducing taxes and spending.”

The lowest effective tax rate in the state was $4.70 per $1,000, levied on properties in Southampton falling within the Sagaponack school district. The taxes on a median-value home there were $2,769, the lowest in Suffolk County.

The property taxes on median-value homes in at least two villages, Old Field in Brookhaven and Huntington Bay in Huntington, exceeded $30,000.

Users can see the components of their local property taxes and compare property taxes in multiple communities using the Empire Center’s Property Tax Calculator, a tool on SeeThroughNY.net, the Centers transparency website.

Benchmarking NY uses data from the Office of the State Comptroller to calculate effective tax rates–combined county, municipal and school taxes as a percent of market value–for thousands of localities across the state during 2014, excluding only New York City and Nassau County. The complete report, posted here, includes a list of the top and bottom 20 effective tax rates and the top and bottom 20 tax bills on a locality’s median-value home in each of nine regions.

The Empire Center, based in Albany, is an independent, non-profit, non-partisan think tank dedicated to promoting policies to make New York a better place to live, work and do business.

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