New York lost another 191,367 residents to other states during the year ending last July 1, and its population declined for the first time in a decade, according to the U.S. Census Bureau’s annual population estimates.

The latest estimated annual “net domestic migration” loss—equivalent to nearly the entire population of Yonkers, New York’s fourth-largest city—is the Empire State’s largest since 2007. It brings New York’s total outflow over the last six years to 846,669 people—more than any other state’s, both in absolute terms and as a share of population as measured by the 2010 census.

As of July 1, New York’s estimated population of 19,745,289 was down 1,894 people from a year earlier. While the decrease was slight—just 0.01 percent—2015-16 marks the first year since 2005-06 in which New York State’s estimated population dropped by any amount.

New York also was a national leader in two categories: foreign immigration, which added 118,748 residents, and “natural increase” (births minus deaths), which added 75,794 people. Only California and Florida attracted more foreign immigrants, and only California and Texas had higher natural gains.

The new data put New York further behind Florida, which moved ahead into third place in total state population rankings two years ago. While New York’s population dipped, Florida gained another 367,525 residents in 2015-16. Texas led all states with a gain of 432,957 residents in that period. Ranked by percentage growth, Utah, Nevada, Idaho and Florida topped the list.

Six-year cumulative migration data for all states are detailed here.

The Census Bureau’s 2015 county-by-county migration data are broken down here.

Where are New Yorkers headed? Some answers in this September 2011 report.

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About the Author

E.J. McMahon

Edmund J. McMahon is the Empire Center’s founder and research director.

Read more by E.J. McMahon

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The Empire Center is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit think tank located in Albany, New York. Our mission is to make New York a better place to live and work by promoting public policy reforms grounded in free-market principles, personal responsibility, and the ideals of effective and accountable government.