Long plagued by an exodus of its residents, New York in the past year lost nearly a quarter-million people to other states. But while an influx of foreign immigrants and a ”natural” gain from births over the past six years has offset the state’s population loss, a new Empire Center Research Bulletin based on the latest Census data shows New York has been growing at less than one-third the national rate this decade.

Authored by Empire Center for Public Policy Dirtector E.J. McMahon and Research Associate Kathryn McCall, the Research Bulletin highlights these findings:

— Roughly 12 out of every 1,000 New York residents moved elsewhere in the country between mid-2005 and mid-2006 — nearly double the overall rate of out-migration for the slow-going Northeast region.

— New York’s loss of 225,766 people to other states between 2005 and 2006 was exceeded only by out-migration totals for California and hurricane-ravaged Louisiana.

— More than 1.2 million New York residents have moved to other states since 2000 — the biggest such loss experienced by any state.

The full bulletin can be found here: https://empirecenter.org/pb/2007/01/migrating_new_y.php

About the Author

Tim Hoefer

Tim Hoefer is president & CEO of the Empire Center for Public Policy.

Read more by Tim Hoefer

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