health-ins-300x225-9563457The scores of New York’s nursing homes dipped to an average of 3.19 out of 5 stars in the federal government’s latest Nursing Home Compare report card, down from 3.33 in January.

However, the national average dropped even further, from 3.35 stars to 3.06. New York’s standing improved from 31st to 27th among the 50 states.

The New York City area, with 300 nursing homes rated, had the best regional average at 3.82. The 31 rated homes in the North Country had the lowest regional average at 2.16 (see table).

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Source: CMS Nursing Home Compare. *Column does not total because of overlap among regions. (Click to enlarge.)

 

New York’s middling statewide performance comes in spite of high costs. The median price of a semi-private room, at $141,000 per year, was the fifth highest in the country, according to a 2018 survey by the long-term insurance firm Genworth.

The state’s per capita spending on nursing homes was 29 percent above the national average in 2014, according to National Health Expenditures data.

The state’s nursing home industry gets much better grades, as a group, than its hospitals – which collectively ranked 50th out of 50 states in the most recent Hospital Compare report card.

Individual nursing homes can be searched by state, city and ZIP code at Center for Medicare & Medicaid Services’ Nursing Home Compare website.

 

About the Author

Bill Hammond

As the Empire Center’s senior fellow for health policy, Bill Hammond tracks fast-moving developments in New York’s massive health care industry, with a focus on how decisions made in Albany and Washington affect the well-being of patients, providers, taxpayers and the state’s economy.

Read more by Bill Hammond

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