“We’ve never been taught how to breathe,” Mayor Eric Adams claimed Tuesday, as he mandated two to five minutes of “mindful breathing” per day for all K-12 students next year.

But the mayor should save his oxygen for the real crisis in our schools — our children are not being taught how to read, if they’re even showing up to class at all.

On New York’s own 3rd-8th grade state assessments, less than half of students scored proficient in English Language Arts or Math last year.

Looking at how many students are actually attending classes, it’s not difficult to understand why.

The announcement ironically came on the last day of classes for the 2022-23 school year — a year in which more than half of NYC seniors were chronically absent.

Read the full piece in the New York Post.

About the Author

Tim Hoefer

Tim Hoefer is president & CEO of the Empire Center for Public Policy.

Read more by Tim Hoefer

You may also like

On School Accountability Policies; It’s In with the New, Tension with the Old

The school choice revolution continues. Six states now allow each child’s education funding to be used for the school or educational expenses of his choice. More states are soon to follow. What seemed impossible only five years ago became permissi Read More

Big Labor’s next target: Grad schools

Christakis remarked on the website that graduate students, now moving to unionize at the school, are not ordinary worker. Read More

NYC’s finances look flush — but Eric Adams’ budget carries many real risks

A few months into its third fiscal year since the pandemic’s start, New York City’s finances have never looked so flush — and so precarious. Read More

Albany’s latest gift to the teachers union will shackle NYC schools — and their budgets

The Legislature last week put a new spin on the debate over “mayoral control” of New York City’s schools by shackling the Big Apple with a costly class-size mandate. Read More

Students Need Reforms, Not HEROES

Families and businesses are watching their bottom lines and stretching each dollar. But House Democrats are pushing a plan to prevent America’s schools from doing the same thing. Read More

Under Assault: New York’s Private and Parochial Schools

Will the Regents and education bureaucrats succeed in forcing nonpublic schools to conform to unprecedented state control? Read More

What NY needs from its next Ed commissioner

Last week’s surprise resignation of the state education commissioner, MaryEllen Elia, leaves New York schools at a crossroads. Depending on whom the Board of Regents selects to succeed Elia, the commissioner can serve as a force for reform or for preserving a troubled status quo. Read More

Northport’s cash cow is Long Island’s burden

Among New York school districts with enrollments of 4,000 or more, the list of highest property taxes per pupil is what you’d expect — topped by Great Neck, Scarsdale, Syosset and Bedford. In fifth place is a somewhat less wealthy outlier: the Northport-East Northport district. It will raise $28,556 per pupil in property taxes next year, based on data from the state’s 2018-19 Property Tax Report Card. That’s 57 percent above the Suffolk County average. Read More