Job growth in New York over the past year fell below the national rate for the first time since the recession, Comptroller Thomnas DiNapoli points out in a report issued today.

In a news release summarizing its findings, the comptroller’s office notes that “New York added 110,000 jobs between June 2012 and 2013.”

However:

… [O]ver the same period, national job growth rates exceeded New York’s in nearly every major employment sector – professional services; leisure and hospitality; trade, transportation and utilities; financial activities; and mining, logging and construction.

New York outperformed the nation in education and health job growth, but government jobs decreased in the state by 1.1 percent. The state’s job growth rate, however, declined to 1.8 percent in 2012 from 2.1 percent in 2011. The national rate of growth increased to 2.2 percent from 1.8 percent during that time frame.

This is not exactly shocking news; a comparison of year-over-year growth rates for New York and the nation is a regular feature of the monthly state Labor Department employment report, for example.  However, DiNapoli’s report provides very useful in-depth analysis of trends by employment sector.  For example, it underscores the continued relative weakness of manufacturing in New York, which has continued to shed jobs more quickly the national average.

The report also features tables comparing New York to national trends in per-capita income and GDP growth, and the following table underscoring New York’s continued reliance on foreign immigrants to make up for its “domestic migration” loss of residents to other states.

screen-shot-2013-08-23-at-112342-am-6312025

Tags:

About the Author

E.J. McMahon

Edmund J. McMahon is Empire Center's founder and a senior fellow.

Read more by E.J. McMahon

You may also like

At end of ’22, NY still near bottom in pandemic recovery

The more time passes since the spring 2020 Covid-19 outbreak, the more New York stands out among all states for the weakness of its post-pandemic employment recovery. As of December, seasonally adjusted private employment in New York was still nearly 2 Read More

What’s behind NY’s union membership slide?

The frequency with which New York workers are choosing to belong to a union last year continued its multi-year decline. Read More

NY pandemic recovery update: climbing, but still far behind

Private employment in New York State remained more than 300,000 jobs short of the pre-pandemic level Read More

NY’s jobs recovery now strongest downstate

The Empire State's private-sector employment gains over the past year have been increasingly concentrated in New York City. Read More

The New Greenwashing – False Advertising about Green Energy Jobs 

In the private sector, false advertising can get you into legal trouble. In the public sector, it’s often good politics.   Read More

The debate over Medicaid home-care funding needs a reality check

The push in Albany to boost wages for home health aides is seemingly disconnected from the larger realities of the state’s long-term care system. As they , officials in the home care industry are warning that the state faces an of in-home caregivers Read More

As leaves turn, NY’s post-pandemic recovery still has very far to go

New York was the national epicenter of the pandemic, and Governor Cuomo's "New York State on PAUSE" business shutdowns and other restrictions led, in short order, to the loss of nearly 2 million jobs in the first full month after the infection began spreading in the New York City area. Read More

More NY job gains in August—but employment needs to rise a lot further

New York's jobs report for August looked relatively strong—but only by comparison, that is, with what was generally regarded as a disappointing national number. On a seasonally adjusted basis, New York gained 28,000 private-sector jobs last month—a growth rate of 0.4 percent, according to preliminary monthly estimates from the state Labor Department. Read More

Empire Center Logo Enjoying our work? Sign up for email alerts on our latest news and research.
Together, we can make New York a better place to live and work!