Long plagued by an exodus of its residents, New York in the past year lost nearly a quarter-million people to other states. But while an influx of foreign immigrants and a ”natural” gain from births over the past six years has offset the state’s population loss, a new Empire Center Research Bulletin based on the latest Census data shows New York has been growing at less than one-third the national rate this decade.

Authored by Empire Center for Public Policy Dirtector E.J. McMahon and Research Associate Kathryn McCall, the Research Bulletin highlights these findings:

— Roughly 12 out of every 1,000 New York residents moved elsewhere in the country between mid-2005 and mid-2006 — nearly double the overall rate of out-migration for the slow-going Northeast region.

— New York’s loss of 225,766 people to other states between 2005 and 2006 was exceeded only by out-migration totals for California and hurricane-ravaged Louisiana.

— More than 1.2 million New York residents have moved to other states since 2000 — the biggest such loss experienced by any state.

The full bulletin can be found here.

About the Author

Tim Hoefer

Tim Hoefer is the executive director of the Empire Center for Public Policy.

Read more by Tim Hoefer

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About

The Empire Center is an independent, non-partisan, non-profit think tank located in Albany, New York. Our mission is to make New York a better place to live and work by promoting public policy reforms grounded in free-market principles, personal responsibility, and the ideals of effective and accountable government.